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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
the economy to improve, but at a slower rate than the united states and develops nations. he's attending the g20 finance minister meetings. from the council on foreign relations, this is an hour. >> [inaudible] >> well, ladies and gentlemen, i'm cochair of the council on foreign relations, and we are privileged, indeed to have with us the honorable, highly experienced german government offiho crrently serving a minister o finance. you have the resumÉ, we are running late, and to maximize time for conversation, i'll be undipmatically brief, but let me say that minister has held four positions of chandler cole who served as federal minister for special tasks, head of the council and minister of the interior. under chancellor merkel 2005 to 2009 served as ministers of the interior. he is a long standing leader of the christian democratic union serving as its chair in 1991. he's bee a 1972 serving as parment ri whip from 1981-84, and in 1990, led negotiations for the reimplication of east east germ. he is proficient in economics of law, a doctor of law, and he's written a number of books most rec
, that doesn't involve risks to the government micromanaging the economy. if you say okay which is going to have a flat tariff of 10% or 20% or 30% whatever it takes to get to a zero trade deficit that doesn't introduce a lot of corruption or a lot of dangers bad policymaking because it's a very simple policy. it's just determined by an arithmetical formula and there's no opportunity for anybody to play games. one of the good things about it if you have a flat tariff, is if you had a 30% tariff on imported goods that's not enough to relocate the production of t-shirts that united states because cost is too great. it's great to relocate things like silicon wafer fabrication so would tend to relocate back to the u.s. high value capital-intensive skill intensive industries which is of course what we want to do. those are the industries that are high-quality -- high-quality into she wants to have and those are the industries that don't want to lose. i point that out just to point out that if you do get serious about protectionism, protectionism has a logic to it which if you understand what
to affect business and the economy in the united states and what it all means for your money melissa: straight to our top story tonight, the city of boston, massachusetts, is still reeling following yesterday's horrific bombing near the finish line of the boston marathon. president obama speaking out today on the tragedy, calling the attack, an act of terrorism. now with the latest news out of boston is fox news's craig boswell. >> the bombs detonated at the boston marathon used six liter pressure cookers packed with shards of metal, nail and ball bearings. they were place inside a black duffel bag and set on the ground. >> we had an attack. >> doctors removed sharp objects from lower extremities of victims. >> many have wound mostly in the lower part of their body, wound rated to the place effect of the bomb as well as small metallic fragments. >> the two bombs exploded about 12 seconds apart. the first near the finish line where 8-year-old martin richard was there to cheer on his father. the little boy was killed in the blast. when he ran back to his mother,wo siblings. bill richar
because the economy s been desoying money since the real estate market crashed. it's an offsetting situation and it is reversible. if the private markets were creating welgts and thefederal reserve which is creating money, yeah, you'd probably have inflation. but there's proof in the balance of the cpi has been the flattest it's been -- >> somewhere, that this you're going through is going to meet. and that may spark it. but what you're saying is that gold is still way above an inflation curve? >> yeah, it's not thing -- look, i don't believe there's going to be rampant inflation. but iffyou do there is dozens of strategies that are not gold that will do a better job for an investor. especially a small individual investor who's not an institutionalized, billions of dollars to allocate -- >> like real estate? >> real estate remains the ultimate inflation hedge for the average person. you can buy at depressed prices, boht a $200,000 house with a $150,000 fixed rate loan for 3%, thank you federal government for backing it. if there's hyperinflation wouldn't that home be worth $1 milli
by now if we were going to have it. and yet i keep on -- the fed is printing money because the economy has been destroying money since the real estate market crashed. it's an offsetting situation and it is reversible. if the private markets were creating welgts and the federal reserve which is creating money, yeah, you'd probably have inflation. but there's proof in the balance of the cpi has been the flattest it's been -- >> somewhere, that this you're going through is going to meet. and that may spark it. but what you're saying is that gold is still way above an inflation curve? >> yeah, it's not thing -- look, i don't believe there's going to be rampant inflation. but iffyou do there is dozens of strategies that are not gold that will do a better job for an investor. especially a small individual investor who's not an institutionalized, billions of dollars to allocate -- >> like real estate? >> real estate remains the ultimate inflation hedge for the average person. you can buy at depressed prices, bought a $200,000 house with a $150,000 fixed rate loan for 3%, thank you federal gov
in the economy and the lack of topline growth you're seeing from big companies reporting, like heather was referring to. >> rob, that was my point, really, is this change in market psychology. during the first quarter, that seemed to be how the market rationalized moving higher. even with a bad economic report, the fed is going to still be pumping out the $85 billion a month, so we shouldn't worry. but now we seem to be worried this week. what's going on? >> yeah, bill. i'm getting worried. i think the market psychology has changed a bit, so now we actually need good news to propel stocks higher, and i've been overweight stocks for 18 months now, but i've gotten a little more defensive here. i upgraded consumer staples, downgraded materials. haven't gone to an underweight on stocks yet, but i'm watching closely. as greg just mentioned, if the economic indicators are for the third summer in a row, turning down, this might be another sell in may, go away type summer. i don't think we're quite there yet, though. >> what are the most important numbers that we're looking at here, after the
the stock averages and they've been told the economy is doing great, so what's changed? you know, what's changed is that we got a little complacent. i think everybody looks at the market and says we weren't really fulling gauging what might happen if the economy slows down or doesn't speed up. i think today was just the wreck reckoning for a lot of those concerns. >> we've been in a period where people are expecting a correction from whatever highs we've been hitting here lately. do you think this is the beginning of that correction right now? >> i think we're certainly seeing a bit of a correction. i don't know how much more it has tooz, however, because fundamentally, we have very low interest rates and u.s. corporations are still posting record high levels of earnings against the backdrop of a weak global economy. if we get a big downdraft from whatever happens out of boston or some other factor, that's a real risk factor, but near term, very strong earnings, hard to argue with stocks with that backdrop. >> you just mexed the boston marathon incident. we doebt have the complete stor
of tumultuous, russia's president is coming under controver controversy. while russia's economy hadn't performed badly last year, falling commodity prices risk pushing the country into recession. these comments come just hours after president putin threatened to fire officials for not following his orders on public spending. geoff cutmore is outside this event. what are you hearing about these concerns and the russian economy overnight? >> reporter: absolutely. fascinating issue. we clearly see some risks emerging in the russian government at this point. and i just want to put that issue to one side for a moment. because i have with me li jiaoung. he is a former chinese minister. i'm fortunate to get the opportunity to talk to him at this event. thanks very much for speaking to me. if i could just start off by asking you, clearly, the world has been focused on the terrorist events in boston and this tragic, very un pleasaplea event. i wonder if you could dwifs a perspective from the chinese point of view here because nobody wants to see terrorism and in particular i think the chinese have an int
or does it matter if an economy will print or grow or whatever? >> the study which said once government debt hits 90% of gdp growth goes off a cliff has been thoroughly discredited and they must kick themselves that they made a mistake on the spreadsheet. people pay attention to the paper which has just come out that shows that this is a pretty sloppy piece of work. the conclusion drawn in terms of the impact of high debt to growth has been basically discredited now. it's fairly clear that governments have a lot more scope to deal with problems. >> was china wrong to pursue this strategy then to help cushion the effect of the global financial crisis and even though people are quite concerned about it including some of the chinese themselves, it sounds like from what you're saying all things considered you don't see a hard landing or crisis as a result. >> as you always say in china, it's too early to tell. i think they have a margin to get things right. if you look at greece, they went into european monetary union and have this lovely window to fix things. a lot of credit with foreign i
rights prevail our countries where people do better, economies thrive, rule of law is stronger, governments are more effective and more responsive, and they are countries that lead on the world stage and project stability across their regions. strong respect for human rights isn't merely an indicator that a country is likely doing well. it actually unleashes a countries potential, and it helps to advance growth and progress. so i ask you just to think of the country like burma for a minute. because of steps towards democratic reform and stronger human rights protections, a country that had been isolated for years is now making progress. as it reached where we wanted to be? know, but it's on the road. it's moving. and more people are contributed economy and participating in the government, leading toasr growth andnt. and by starting to embrace universal rights, the burmese government has opened the doors to a stronger partnership with their neighborhood and with countries around the world. many challenges remain. corruption has to be rooted out. remaining political prisoners nee
they will have going forward on our economy. dagen: peter barnes has much more on this. peter: we looked at research reports on the impact of attacks of 9/11 back in 2001. the current economy has shown some softness recently in job creation and retail sales. any hits to consumer confidence may make things worse. two economists that i have talked to this morning do not think it will get too bad. the 9/11 attacks were targeted for the financial systems. consumer confidence rose sharply after the 9/11 attacks. experiencing the biggest monthly drop in a decade. the attacks caused more than 400 mass layoffs and displaced 130,000 workers. industrial production fell back then. the unemployment rate jumped more than a half a percentage point. we were already in a recession that september. we are not in a recession today. boston is not an economic center. >> maybe a day or two people will be hesitant about going out shopping. assuming nothing else happens, it should last much longer. peter: it could take a short-term hit because of boston. they are more worried about the impact on the economy and
the economy french economy is in. now, the german survey responses say the economies were worried about the impact prices. in france, they're much more domestically focused with some suggestions that things couldn't get any worse. >> well, the domestic situation is already a known negative. just to recap for viewers, as well, the composite, which includes both the services and is manufacturing, pmi came in at 46.5 in april for the eurozone. that was just ever so slightly above the 46.4 estimate and manufacturing came in 46.5. the services figure was 46.6. but, again, it's some of the weakness in the core economy of germany that's catching the market's attention this morning. the euro weaker, the xetra dax off by about 0.2%. we're going to get some uk data out at 9:30. also coming up on the show, the how companies are battling to take a foothold in the alternative energy market in china. then at 11:10, we'll be joined by jim o'neill as he nears the end of his tenure at goldman sachs. we'll get his best and worst investment calls from his time in the city. we'll hear up for earnings from
there that the economy is losing steam, especially with the stock market plunge that we have recently seen? - well, i think clearly there has been some disappointing economic data. maybe it is the fear that we all had with the government cutbacks and also the tax hike that we had - that's the increased payroll tax for social security that we saw - so that is biting into the economy. but clearly, almost all the data, not only here but around the world, has come out weaker, so that is real; and combine that with some disappointing earnings on balance, and i think that is cause for concern or pause for the market right now. - gold futures made a mighty move to the downside this week. what are you seeing in gold mining stocks? - wow, i tell you, it was a real blowout in gold. gold is one of those assets, but i look at gold back in '08 was, i think, a low $600, and it is now still, what, close to $1,400? so, a set-back was ok, it was just one of those classic commodity washouts. gold miners, on the other hand, they have lagged the price of gold for the past several years at least, and a lot of that has to
: seasonally strong time of year for home sales. overall, the u.s. economy is running below its historical trend. this is a study done by the index. my next guest says the economy sluggish growth may be the most ideal condition for investors. joining us is now jack. welcome to you. >> thank you, lori. lori: you see this as a prime opportunity. some new investment dollars could go into the stock market. >> yes, potentially. fair value in the market is probably about 1520. we are slightly ahead of that. we have a lot of favorable factors. one, keep money. we have stocks that look cheap. if we can get confidence, you know, of investors, but also builds confidence picking up, i think you could see treasurers and armature treasurers start to exploit that difference. as long as the fed keeps the backdrop in place, then the market can go higher. we do not want to fall into a double dip type of scenario. on the other hand, we do not want anything too strong to suggest that perhaps the fed will take its foot off the accelerator. lori: if you have new money to invest, what type of stocks would you p
worried about china especially about the economy after the lower than expected growth numbers that we saw this week. and he addressed that. he was talking a bit about the concerns about rising debt levels and he played those down. he played down the weaker growth. >> i don't think people should panic about chinese economy will continue to grow at the sustainable level. the government's target could be fulfilled without much difficulty and we aim at the quality of the growth. i don't think achieving 7, 7.5% is a big deal for china. i don't think so. >> the fund invests heavily in resources. i couldn't help myself from asking him specifically about gold. he believes the sudden drop in gold is general instability in the global economy. he hopes it comes back at some point soon. >> thank you very much. we were watching that and that's the perfect segue. we've been watching what's happening and it's important to see what the chinese think about this and no better person than cic chairman. we'll talk about gold and what's been happening not only with gold but also oil prices after yesterday slu
. the economy is getting worse. but the fed is all in. they're at 85 a month. now, maybe some people like jim bulllard are talking about doing more, but that's not on the fed's table right now. what's on their table is potentially tapering out of the 85 a month when the market wants more. the market is stuck. they want more from the fed, because the economy is weakening, or they want the economy to rebound and nothing's happening and we jump around all over the place. >> warren, what do you think? you've been constructive on this market all through the first quarter. you felt like there was more to go here. but do you feel like the psychology is changing with the volatility that we've seen this week? >> i'll tell you, this week has been a little bit troubling, and i have been pretty bullish up until this point. when you tend to see days like this, where the day after day, up and down bid on the dow, 100-plus point move on any given day, that's a sign that this market is truly struggling. >> are you rethinking your bullish position, at least for the short-term? >> a little bit. i think the thi
? >> my instinct tells me that the answer is no, that in economic terms i think the market, the economy at large will move beyond this relatively quickly. but at the same time, there may be some lingering impact in terms of investor sentiment. the sell-off clearly that occurred on friday and then again on monday, in my opinion, was a reassessment of the pace of global growth. important to point out that most of the weakness yesterday was already in the market before the bombings took place. but clearly, there is an impact on investor sentiment, a reminder that it's a dangerous world. and so you may see a little bit less of a risk appetite going forward. in economic terms, i think we'll move beyond it fairly quickly. >> yeah. john, i guess you would ask, at this point, you wouldn't think that consumers would change behavior based on this. it could potentially aveng -- i don't know, whatever group you want to talk about, jonathan, restaurants or any type of tourists activities. nothing to expect at this point, do you think? >> if you said to me are consumers going to be spending time watc
. -- voyeurism. >> there will will certainly be taking a very close look. >> the world's emerging economy are saying german investment and bilateral trade. last week it was the indian leader here signing off and billions in deals. >> this tuesday, the ecuador president has been at the german capital. he is here for the 13th annual conference. the region is in the midst of a massive boom with german exports up by 39% last year alone. >> he is in germany for the first time. the president has high expectations of berlin and he is full of praise for his own country. >> ecuador is one of the most dynamic countries and latin america. the economy across latin america grew by 3.5% between 2007 and 2012. but in ecuador, it grew by 3.3%. >> the small, latin american country has not been very high on the german business sectors agenda until now. generally, interest in latin america has grown considerably recently. that is despite trade barriers in certain areas. german investment already amounts to 30 billion euros. >> they just the same difficulty as others. medium-sized companies today are ready t
weeks. >> the german economy is slowly awakening from its winter sleep. the country's leading economic research institutes have presented their spring forecast, saying they expect moderate growth of about 0.8% this year, but the think tanks are a bit more upbeat about 2014, where the forecast growth to reach about 2%, provided the current eurozone debt crisis does not spiral out of control. >> the economic outlook is bright. it is been booming bavaria. the state boasts near full employment. businesses like this are wide. it is an engineering firm. residential -- residents are up, order books full. it provides a snapshot of the wider german economy. one of the country's leading think tanks believes it will keep on growing because there are tentative signs europe is on the mend. >> these figures reflect the diminishing uncertainty and the fact the markets are now calmer. >> the think tank's forecast is much more optimistic than the german government policy official estimate, and ultimately, there will be exporters who decide who gets it right and who gets it wrong. >> onto thursday's mar
and granger. that's a great tell of the real economy. boy, it's hard not to -- >> there's a lot going on regarding housing. we'll keep our eyes on the homebuilders. >> these people want to try to find a hole in the housing starts, good luck. this is a very big move and we're building far fewer homes than what are destroyed by fire and flood. a lot of people will live with their mother-in-laws. >> despite what we know about the price of building products, right? and the cost of contractors and electricians. >> and i think some of those costs again will come down. copper came down big, and aluminum bid. we'll take you to boston. we're expecting this to be the fbi in charge of the boston field office and deval patrick there and the u.s. attorney carmen ortiz. let's listen in. >> everyone, thank you for coming this morning. less than 24 hours after yesterday's act of terror we wanted to organize a briefing for you with the information that we have. the mayor is here, the members of our congressional delegation, all of the law enforcement leadership. we have several people who want to pres
and a reminder that the government is a net drag on this u.s. economy. >>> check out auto nation. there is no better gainer on the s&p. stock that's already up 17% this year. >> it's remarkable. >> we all know what pent-up demand is for cars. we all know the mileage that's on the average trade-in. >> i like mike jackson. when you contrast europe with the united states, think of auto nation. okay? they can't move a car in europe. they can't move one across the street. >> you're absolutely right. talk about a dichotomy. >> we are not one world. used cars going up, too? the country you can get, wells fargo largest auto loan company. you can get money for a car. it is tougher to get money. richard smith, i have this guy from realogy. a large real estate company. they're holding their value much more than you thought in the united states. >> morgan stanley is down 3%. talked about m and a, lack of activity saying it just reflects the ceo's lack of confidence with regards to earnings power. >> which is what you hear. those who are doing deals, it is interesting, are the likes of -- or
again and ain, they can't grow the top line because the economy isn't supporting that. what do you do? how do you respond to that? how do you protect your money? >> well the thing is you have to understand, actually mark hit on a great point, since 2009 revenuesnly grown by about 7% of the earnings have grown by almost 230%. the disparity's come from things like stock buybacks, accounting gimmickry in terms when do we account for stuff and when we don't. and so what drives corporate growth in the stock markets over the long term is that top line revenue, sales. that's what we node to see. that is what --. melissa: lance, i know that, tell me how do i protect my wealth in light of that? i hear what you're saying but you're reiterating what the guys before you said. we already agree with that. how do i protect my money >> i know. the point is we're telling you the strength of the economy the economy is getting a lot weaker here. all recent data shows it. it means cash and fixed income will perform better most likely over nt six to nine months while we g through this process. melissa: ca
does, and he believes -- he actually says the economy is not bad for their customer base as you might think. in an environment like this malone cease cheap money and the ability to lever up cash flow-producing businesses and he will keep doing that and liberty global will be leveled high. you get to some high levels in terms of how much debt versus how much cash flow you have. nonetheless, that's a strategy and that continues to be one. >> use it. use it. use it. >> everyone always talks about how they've got to go overseas and then they pay too much. here's a guy who is going in and he's not paying too much. he is down substantially and any time you ever listen to a conference call, it's, like, woe is me, and here's a guy that says i'm taking advantage of it and that means to me that there will be a bottom because he's too smart to bet against them. >> we'll meet coat-directors of a documentary on bernie madoff said to premiere at new york's tribeca film festival. the dow is down 108, reversing what we got yesterday. back in a minute. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you engineer a
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)